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20121201
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they are investing from pre-k through college. there will have more in china and any of them the entire u.s. work force. we're focused on a global economy. those from harvard are competing globally with students from china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all
-- but it is happening. but you would take note and stop to think about it anymore. >> 2012 here in the u.s. gave us a glimpse of the sort of future that is in store if we do not do something to avert -- if we don't shift away from business as usual. we saw record temperatures last summer. we saw record drought for large for the country. in colorado, that came together with record fuel. because of the pine bark beetle infestation, due to record warm winters, it was literally a perfect storm of macroclimate's and assesses the came together to bring this wildfire. we saw american storm. and hurricane. it broke previous records and flooding in new york city. and there's certainly a climate change in the sense that, from the 13 -- at least 1 foot of that would have saved lives. that is the difference between a bad and a disastrous flooding event. that storm was sitting over near-record temperatures. we saw that a year ago. warm temperatures were sitting off the east coast of the u.s. it was a slower-moving storm and is the goal of the moisture, leading to record flooding over a large part of the western
. they weren't always investing in american workers. they certainly weren't willing to make them in the u.s. auto industry. remember, it was just a few years ago that our auto industry was on the verge of collapse. gm, chrysler were all on the brink of failure. and if they failed, the suppliers and distributors that get their business from those companies, they would have died off, too. even ford could have gone down -- production halted. factories shuttered. once proud companies chopped up and sold off for scraps. and all of you -- the men and women who built these companies with your own hands -- would have been hung out to dry. and everybody in this community that depends on you -- restaurant owners, storekeepers, bartenders -- their livelihoods would have been at stake, too. so i wasn't about to let that happen. i placed my bet on american workers. we bet on american ingenuity. i'd make that same bet any day of the week. [applause] three and a half years later, that bet is paying off. this industry has added over a quarter of a million new jobs. assembly lines are humming again. the ame
again at those five most important words from my perspective in the middle of the preamble of the u.s. constitution, providing for the common defense, that we are doing that and exactly that with this measure. so i encourage my colleagues to support this conference -- the rule and the conference report that we will have and i believe it will be of great benefit to our men and women in uniform and to the future security of the united states of america and our allies and i thank my friend for yielding me the 15 seconds. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from massachusetts. mr. mcgovern: i yield 1 1/2 minutes to the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. altmire. mr. altmire: mr. speaker, as we begin debate on this act, it's critical we understand just how important it is to our troops and to our country that we pass this legislation with a bipartisan vote. it's easy to get bogged down in partisanship on most issues, but this cannot be one of them. this legislation provides the men and women of our armed forces the necessary equipment and financial support to ef
, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part to instruct boeing to build. -- to build in the deficit areas of the u.s. it is pragmatic. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollarized, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing -- unless those who do not have dollars are given dollars to spend purchasing, the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. the 1950's and the 1960's. a period of immense stability very low inflation. very low unemployment. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why did it end? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism could no longer be sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. -- if you do not have it? enter a young turk in 1971. actually, he was the american, but you know what i mean. well, paul volcker -- that name may ring a bell. in 1971, paul
have placed those same individuals under u.s. sanctions. talks between the garcia government and the environment -- m 23 began on december 29 in uganda and are being mediated with uganda as the chair on the international conference of the great lakes region known as the i c g lra. as the two sides begin substantive con -- talks, the current cease-fire is holding and the parties continue to express commitment to a dialogue. much of the m-23's military success and prowess and would not have been possible without outside support. there's a credit to ballpark -- body of evidence that corroborates the assertions of the u.n. experts that the rwanda government provided significant military and political support to the end-23. while there is evidence of uganda providing support to and- 23, we do not have a body of evidence suggesting that the ugandan government as a policy supported the m-23. nonetheless, we sit and -- we continue to urge, ugandan officials that -- to make sure that supplies do not originate or travel through that territory. and we have not limited our response to di
of the national press club. secretary panetta will discuss the fed's policy and the challenges facing the u.s. military. who -- discusses defense policy and challenges facing the u.s. military. ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with >> obesity in this country is nothing short of a public health crisis. >> it is only when somebody had their own agenda. >> so much influence. >> i think they serve as a window on the path to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante. >> many of the women were writers, journalists. they wrote books. >> they were more interesting as human beings in many cases than their husbands, if only because they are not first and form of reform most defined by political ambitions. >> dolly madison loves every minute of the. monroe hated it. >> you cannot rule without including what women want and what women have. you could not. >> breathless and too much looking down and it was a little too fast. not enough change of pace. >> yes, ma'am. >> she wrote in her memoir that she may never -- that she never made a dec
like. you're going to see the u.s. senate become stronger because of the results of tim scott, not because of what he looks like. so this is not -- that's why i said he earned this spot. i understand that we made history today and i am proud that we made history today. i also believe in the people of south carolina and the people of this country. as the daughter of indian immigrants that saw early on that you can be anything you want to be and nothing can get in your way, i want to remind everybody that is not the messenger, it will always be the message. tim scott has the right message. >> [inaudible] >> from my perspective, if you get the message right and you market it well, people listen. america is still a center right nation. the fact is that the better we get at marketing our message, the more it will resonate. i think fresh faces and authenticity goes a long way in the political process. you don't have to save the best, but you have to go there. we'll go to new places and new territories and new lands in many ways. this message of conservatism will reach the ends of th
. these are the carpets that are exported to the u.s. and put in our sitting rooms. this is often the production environment. a local product type of south asia cigarette. a hurricane in 2009 wiped out a large swath of southeastern ban gal and the land owners came in and said we will rebuild your home but in exchange for that you have to do this. so they don't get a wage they get a roof. this is a raw tobaccos going into the hands of children. ing a culture is another one. often seasonal contracts they will go between agriculture and carpets dependsing to season. because of the seasonal jumping around and entering into these bondage agreements these are voluntary so i don't know if they count as slavery or forced labor. stone breaking is another big one that has been going on for generations and generations it feeds in the construction industry. they were subject of the second supreme court case on bonded labor in india. 1983 case, someone brought a claim under the bonded labor act in india which was passed in 1976. i went to the same one three decades later and many of the same conditions still
from the u.s., which was dragging its feet. the final plan, the german plan, would be to soften air bases then in lit august or september crush the remnants of the r.a.f. it was a good plan but it wasn't working and goring got hitler's permission to bomb the ports. bombing was so ineffective on both sides that meant they would be bombing houses. they did. and churchill said give it back to them. that was the beginning. so, the blitz starts on september 7, i think, the evening. and germans came 81 of the next 82 nights or something like that. and the terror bombing they feared and predicted began. and there was no stopping the bombers. host: how many were killed and how many wounded in great brita britain? guest: i think about 40,000 to 45,000 londoners and 60,000 throughout then the rockets came. 60,000 people in a country of 47 million, you extrapolate, that would be at the time almost 2 200,000 americans, unimaginable numbers then and now for us in the united states. host: physically what did winston do during that time, where did he live? how did he relate to london and great bri
it was a scare tactic to build up the army. it did not help the u.s. was dragging its feet. the final plan, the german plan would be to soften up air bases in late august, early september, crushed the remnants of the raf. it was a good plan. while daring -- goering got pillar's permission to bomb the ports -- bombing was so ineffective for both sides. churchill said, give it back to them. and that was the beginning. so, the blitz starts on september 7 in the evening. the germans came the next 81, 82 nights, something like that. and the terror bombing that they had feared and predicted began. there was no stopping the bombers. the bombers always got through. >> tommy people were killed and wounded in great britain? >> i think about 45,000 londoners were killed. at the end, the v2 rockets came. 60,000 people in a country of 47 million. you extrapolate -- that would be almost 200,000 americans. unimaginable numbers now in united states. >> physically, what did winston churchill do during that time? where did he live? how did you relate to london during the blitz? >> he, with reluctance, left
the september 11 attacks on the u.s. mission in benghazi, libya. that is live thursday at 1:00 p.m. eastern on cspan 3. the two connecticut u.s. senators talked about last week's school shootings in newtown, conn.. this is 40 minutes. >> mr. president, we appear to be in one of those periods of time where we are working too often through the valley of the shadow of death. senator blumenthal and i've come to the floor to speak about the tragedy that occurred, the senseless horrific attacks on innocent people in newtown, conn.. last friday. we must also note with extraordinary respect and sense of loss the death of our truly beloved colleague, senator dan inouye of hawaii. america, as senator reid and senator durbin made so car, america has lost a true hero, a patriot. this senate has lost a great leader, a leader whose accomplishments have been literally historic, and i think all of us have lost a friend. last evening, senator akaka spoke about how dan inouye's legacy, i'm paraphrasing here, was all aund hawi and all he had done for the state. the truth is that i think mt every state in the
. -- and 2008. the u.s. utilizing its trade deficit with the rest of the world has been operating like a huge vacuum cleaner. sucking into the united states the net exports of europe, japan, and lately china. thus providing exporters -- germany, japan, or china -- with the requisite demand necessary. so, the ever expanding trade deficit was not an accident. it was a very clever way of replacing one that surplus recycling system with another. the first one, it was one where america had a surplus and america decided instead of doing what germany is doing at the moment -- which is cutting its nose to spite its face, and thereby ending the -- entering recession by cutting, cutting, cutting -- volcker as the head of the fed at a different idea. we are going to expand our dominance and are well by -- and our wealth by expanding our deficit and using our deficits to provide the rest of the world with the demand which is necessary to grow their economies, even at the expense of hours. -- ours. and who is going to pay for the deficit? if i have an ever-expanding deficit, the bank tells me it is came o
national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> the u.s. house will be gaveling back in in a couple of minutes, 1:45 eastern, and will be voting on federal energy efficiency laws. several governors, members of the national governors association are on capitol hill this afternoon discussing the pending tax hikes and budget cuts, what's known as the fiscal cliff. and they're talking about the economy as well with the senate majority leader, harry reid, and house speaker, john boehner. this after a 90-minute meeting with president obama at the white house this morning where they called for a quick resolution. the governors spoke to reporters at the white house for 15 minutes after that meeting and we'll show you as much as we can until the house gavels in in just a few minutes. >> well, goorn, everybody. i'm jack, the chair of the national governors association, the governor of delaware, joined by governor fallen of oklahoma, she's the vice chair -- governor fallin of oklahoma, she's the vice chair. the governor of arkansas. we are three democrats and three republicans. we just had what i would say
issues and international issues. i do not apply those values just to u.s. citizens but to apply the same desires for fairness and justice with regard to our foreign policy, u.s. foreign- policy. i do find that my religious upbringing does -- is interwoven in however prison as. host: rich from tennessee. independent caller. caller: merry christmas, greta. host: good morning, merry christmas. caller: i echo the last caller. i would say my politics changed from republican to it independent. i voted the constitution party the last presidential election. but i found that most people who are serious voters do consider moral beliefs, our laws are based on morality. whether the source is a religion or their own sense of morality which they probably borrowed from other religions, how can you not consider morality and believes when you are voting? otherwise, you are simply pushing a lever based upon whims. to me it is a natural thing to consider religion and believes when -- beliefs when you are considering issues. whether the economy, health care, anything else. it is informed by what you have be
? thank you. you do look familiar. where did i see you before? u.s. they good question, did you not? -- you asked a good question, did you not? what is your name again? >> danielle. >> you are old hat here. you do this all of the time. good to see you. have fun. >> have fun, hey. show me what we are doing. what kind of lollipops are these? is this white house honey? do you know these come from bees we keep in the backyard? why? they make fresh honey, and the health the garden grove. -- they help the garden grow. >> this is good. >> did you taste these? this is good. [laughter] these are really good. ?id you put sugar on these ne how do you get it curly? >> they turned out really cute, and it is a good crunch. we should give some of the photographers some of these to see how good they taste. those are so good. healthy, tasty expects. not bad. -- snacks. not bad. ok. now we desperate. i have to figure out what design. -- now we have to decorate. now i have to figure out what design. decisions, decisions. ok. >> this is all edible, ok, guys? >> once you put this on, you can eat this lo
intracompany system works. as i understand it 92% of all sales outside the u.s.a. are built in ireland. is that right? >> i'm not sure if it was 92% but the vast majority will be built in google in ireland. >> you actually have been making a profit. >> we are making a profit and we're paying taxes. >> in the u.k. >> well, a real profit rather than just avoiding this. >> i have to say we are paying the taxes and not avoiding taxes. >> you are avoiding taxes. >> i think you are avoiding. my question is would you leave? and if you left if you had to pay a higher way to tax on the decent profit, where would you go? >> i think the issue of you understanding here it is about -- if google was a british business -- if google would have been founded in cambridge it would be different because the technology founded where it happened. british is a u.s. business. the activity that happens in the u.k. even if you have to describe it as sales activity which is not exactly what the people do, we can still go and get that activity from the open market at the kind of cost that we're paying the u.k. >>
leader harry reid in the "new york times, returning to the u.s. capitol. his shadow. what's the relationship between harry reid and mitch mcconnell? guest: it's hard to tell. the rhetoric on the senate floor can be pretty tough. they call each other my dear friend whenever you want them on the c-span channels, but i think they both are in a frustrating position. senator harry reid does not have more than 60 members, so we cannot block a filibuster but senator mcconnell is adept at applying in cases where he'd want to block legislation. but i think they both have respect for each other's legislative skills and they have proven in the past that when they need to cut a deal, but can cut a deal and bring their party's members with them. host: john mccain writes a big budget deal is still worth doing. he points out to the history of some of these agreements, most notably with ronald reagan in the 1980's and president bush in 1991 in which republicans agreed to spending cuts that never happened while raising taxes. guest: that's right. there's a little confusion about how much s
and rights of the house. signed, sincerely, david russell, district liaison, u.s. representative david price. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the house stands adjourned until 2:00 >> we are going back to the conference on women in leadership with andrea mitchell and nancy-ann deparle. >> she gave me the notion i could do anything i wanted to do. >> how did she do that? >> she had very high expectations and let me know she expected me to do well in school. when i would talk to her about wanting to work in the white house for being interested in politics or being a lawyer, she said you have to study hard and make good grades. you need to get a scholarship because i will not be able to afford it. she never said -- the sky was the limit. that really was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i did go to law school. in the early 1980's when i got out of law school, i went back to tennessee to practice. i was going around to law firms. there were not that many women in the law firms. i had guys interview me. they would sit me down and say, do you understand you have to try cas
about his new book. he also discussed china and the history of the u.s. constitution. this is just over an hour. >> ok. concepts. for 20 years i have been advising -- roughly half of that on financial economic matters. the other half a variety of topics. about 10 years ago, um we started -- about 10 years ago, we started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the state's. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, study them, and then customize them as appropriate for our own system. and yet in this one respect, they have been a little b
capital in the u.s., wall street and at washington, d.c. i still think that's true. >> so many here. 1984, the business case for a national industrial strategy. 1982, post-conservative america. >> the idea there was you were not looking at traditional conservatives like under the reagan administration. i remember the old howard jarvis tax revolution in california and things like that. you had a whole sequence of radical conservatives also the beginnings of the religious right in the south. this was not a traditional conservatism. >> april of 2003, wealth and democracy, political history of american rich. >> that was more the politics of rich and poor but with a whole lot of detail. at that time you were really seeing what had been an early stage buildup. it was now a major buildup. it went on to be what we finally saw break apart in 2008. >> we talked about richard nixon. before him, what did you think of lyndon johnson and what is his legacy? >> i was never a fan of lyndon johnson. i don't think his legacy is terrific. he was obviously a very capable man. in a number of ways, he was like
totingham, sir we look up in disgunfight and disbelief at discrimination. the u.s. after the civil war, racism. britain in the 180000s, sexism. it wasn't until someone had the initiative to stand up and say, this is wrong, that discrimination was overcome the black civil rights movement for my first example and the suffrage yet mement as my second. but we're still discriminating. at the time, the phrase, equality for all -- it's ridiculous with the age discrimination regarding minimum wage inrder to increase the quality in our democracy the manipulate wage needs to be standard figure for all. the thought that young people areelow their infear you're colleagues and less deserving of a higher wage is outdated, ewan equal. we need to fight for civil liberties for all young people, and with that comes minimum wage for all and for that reason it should be our national campaign. [applause] >> thank you. i'm sorry. we have to wind up the debate becaus we have reached our allotted time. i just want before i call -- to welcome the honorable gentlemen, colonel stewart, who entered the chamber at
attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special account told by janet reno -- special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was stan
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)